Check out the newest movies out on DVD this week! From horror to comedy there's something for everyone.

We the Party

Rating: R

A revealing look at contemporary youth culture, writer-director Mario Van Peebles' 'We the Party' shows teenagers as they are, not as adults would like them to be. Set amidst the latest trends in music, dance and fashion, 'We the Party' is a colorful, cutting-edge comedy set in an ethnically diverse Los Angeles high school during America's first black president. The film focuses on five friends as they deal with romance, money, prom, college, sex, bullies, Facebook, fitting in, standing out, and finding themselves. Evoking such classic teen comedies as 'The Breakfast Club' and 'House Party' but with an attitude and style all its own, 'We the Party' captures the hopes, confusion, challenges and dreams of today's teenagers as they plunge headlong into an uncertain future.

Damsels in Distress

Rating: PG-13

'Damsels in Distress' follows a trio of beautiful girls who set out to revolutionize life at a grungy East Coast College -- the dynamic leader Violet Wister (Greta Gerwig), principled Rose (Megalyn Echikunwoke) and sexy Heather (Carrie MacLemore).

Detention

Rating: R

A handful of high-school students struggle to make it through senior year without dying in this manic satire of teen-themed slasher flicks and youth comedies.

ATM

Rating: R

A murderous psychopath traps three co-workers in an ATM vestibule, and torments them over the course of one terrifying night in this thriller from Buried screenwriter Chris Sparling and emerging director David Brooks.

LOL

Rating: PG-13

Seventeen-year-old Lola (Miley Cyrus) rebounds from a recent break-up by attempting to seduce her ex-boyfriend's best friend, as well as experimenting with drugs and sex, while her clueless mother (Demi Moore) reels in the wake of a recent divorce.

Last Days Here

Rating: Not Rated

'Last Days Here,' the new documentary from Don Argott and Demian Fenton ('The Art of the Steal,' 'Rock School'), is a raw yet unexpectedly touching portrait of cult metal legend Bobby Liebling, chronicling his bid to resurrect his life and career after decades wasting away in his parents' basement. Liebling made his mark in the '70s as the outrageous frontman of Pentagram, a "street" Black Sabbath whose heavy metal riffs once blew audiences' minds. But various acts of self-destruction, multiple band break-ups and botched record deals eventually condemned his music to obscurity. Now in his 50's, wasted by hardcore drug use and living on the charity of his ever-patient mother and father (a former Nixon advisor), Bobby's music is finally discovered by the heavy metal underground. For over three years filmmakers (and metal musicians) Argott and Fenton are witnesses to his unbelievable journey, following the triumphs and downfalls of this underground icon at the crossroads of life and death.